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Posts Tagged ‘cream’


Caramel Apple Cider - Meatballs&MilkshakesNothing says fall like apple cider. I love curling up with a book in my favorite chair with a hot, steamy mug apple cider spiked with homemade caramel and cinnamon. It also makes a great warm drink for holiday parties.

Caramel Apple Cider

1 cup apple cider

1 teaspoon caramel sauce

1 cinnamon stick

Warm the cider with the cinnamon stick to steep. Add the caramel sauce and stir.

Caramel Sauce

1 cup sugar

3 tablespoons water

1 cup cream

1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

Melt the sugar in a saucepan with the water until it starts to turn light brown. Carefully pour in the cream, it will bubble a lot. Add the vanilla and carefully stir. Allow to cool a little before pouring off into a container. It will last for a couple weeks in the fridge.

Caramel Apple Cider - Meatballs&Milkshakes

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I found this recipe on Serious Eats and I couldn’t wait to try it because I love milanos. I know, they’re probably not that good for you and have tons of things in them that I can’t pronounce, but I love them. And that’s even more reason to try this recipe. It was also the first time I used my new kitchen scale, which was rather exciting.

Unfortunately, the texture wasn’t exactly the same. No nice little crunch, but the flavor was pretty similar. If you’re not expecting them to taste like milanos, they’re totally yummy. SO, let’s just call them sandwich cookies. They’re quite tasty and the chocolate filling hardens up nicely so they’re not too messy. Try them out. Just don’t expect them to taste exactly like milanos.

Faux Milanos

3/4 ounce cornstarch

8 ounces flour

4 ounces butter

3 1/2 ounces sugar

2 ounces corn starch

1/4 teaspoon salt

14 teaspoon baking soda

1/4 ounce powdered milk

1 egg and 2 extra whites

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

4 ounces semi-sweet chocolate

2 ounces cream

pinch of salt

Combine the corn starch and flour in a bowl. With a mixer, cream together the sugar, butter, salt, baking soda, powdered milk, and half the vanilla extract. Mix for about 5 minutes, until light and fluffy. Add the whole egg and combine. Add half the dry ingredients and combine. Add one of the egg whites and combine.  Add the remaining dry ingredients and combine. Add the remaining egg white and combine. Transfer to a piping bag (or a ziploc with the corner cut off).

Pipe the dough into 1/2 inch wide, 2 inch long cookies. They will work best if you can make it as thin as possible, so keep the tip close to the cookie sheet. Bake for 25 minutes at 300 degrees or until they start to brown. Let cool.

Melt the chocolate with the cream and remaining vanilla extract and pinch of salt in a double boiler or just in a bowl (I sometimes even use the microwave). You can pipe the chocolate onto the flat side of a cookie or just spoon it carefully on. Place another cookie on top, making sure to match them for size. Let them cool at room temperature or in the fridge until the chocolate hardens.

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I’m pretty sure my favorite pie of all-time is strawberry rhubarb, but it’s hard to choose. Sometimes though, I just don’t want to go to the trouble of making dough and rolling it out. This was one of those days. And then I remembered a blackberry fool recipe I saw somewhere and thought I would create something similar.

A fool is a British dessert that consists of a fruity, jam-like mixture folded into whipped cream. It’s light and rich at the same time, and the leftover strawberry rhubarb mixture was just fantastic on some vanilla ice cream the next day.

Strawberry Fool

4 rhubarb stalks, chopped into 1″ pieces

1 pint strawberries, hulled and sliced

1/2 cup water

Juice of 1/2 lemon

1/2 cup sugar

1 pinch salt

1 cup heavy cream

1/2 cup confectioners sugar

Combine the strawberries, rhubarb, water, sugar, lemon, and salt in a sauce pan over medium heat. Cook together for 15 minutes, until the fruit has softened and broken down. It should look like jam. Refrigerate for at least a couple hours.

Beat the cream with the powdered sugar until stiff peaks have formed. Layer alternating with the fruit mixture into glasses or fold together gently before spooning into glasses.

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I’m a big fan of panna cotta– you can make it ahead, you don’t have to bake it, and it’s creamy and delicious. There’s an infinite variety of ways you can make it, and this version layers a vanilla bean panna cotta with a pomegranate gelatin (homemade jello, of you will). The original recipe I used for the panna cotta made it a little too….gelatinous….so I’ve reduced the amount of gelatin to make it a creamier consistency. Nothing better than vanilla creamy custard! (I know it’s not a custard because it doesn’t have eggs, but it feels the same to me…)

Vanilla Panna Cotta

1 packet unflavored gelatin

1 cup heavy cream

2 cups milk

1 vanilla bean

1/2 cup sugar

Over a double boiler, dissolve the sugar in the milk and heavy cream. Slice the vanilla bean along the length and scrape out the vanilla. Put the vanilla and the pod in the milk mixture and let steep for 10 minutes. The double boiler should be just barely on, you want to keep the mixture warm but not simmering. Add the gelatin, making sure it dissolves and then remove from heat. Strain through a sieve to remove the vanilla pod and any lumps. Pour into your vessels, preferably glass so you can see the layers! Refrigerate for several hours, until they have solidified.

Pomegranate Gelatin

1 packet gelatin

2 cups pomegranate juice, room temperature

2 tablespoons sugar, to taste

Combine the ingredients, making sure the sugar dissolves. Depending on your pomegranate juice, you may need more or less sugar. This is the time to get creative, if you want to add other flavors, go ahead!

Pour the pomegranate gelatin over the panna cotta, creating two layers. Place in the refrigerator again for a couple hours and it will solidify.

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I recently realized that I actually really like parsnips. Who knew? I’ve pretty much only been doing this with them though. But it’s a great fall recipe and it can be made into a really elegant dinner with some seared scallops or some steak slices on top. I usually make a healthier version of this with much less butter and cream, but here’s the full holiday version and you can cut it down as you see fit. Enjoy!

Parsnip Puree

1 pound or about 6 parsnips, washed and cut into 1-2 inch pieces

6 tablespoons butter

2 tablespoons dark sesame oil

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

1.5 teaspoons salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

1/4 cup parsnip cooking water

1/2 cup cream

Cook the parsnips in salted boiling water until a knife goes through easily but they are not falling apart yet. About 20 minutes. Drain them reserving about a cup of the cooking water. Put the parsnips into a blender with 1/4 cup of the cooking water and the butter and blend. Be careful to allow a little air through the top of the blender, because you have hot veggies in there and you don’t want the steam to build up.

Add the rest of the ingredients and blend to combine. You want to use as little liquid as possible while allowing your blender to actually blend the ingredients. You may want to reserve more of the cooking liquid and cream at first, and just add them if you need it to make the blender move. Also, depending on how salted your cooking liquid was, you may need to season with more or less salt.

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This was a quick weeknight recipe that I created to use what little was left in the pantry. It’s a little Italian like a chicken cacciatore, a little French with the vermouth and cream, definitely delicious. It ended up being my favorite dinner of the week. And with only boneless chicken breasts, it cooks really quickly. Add some egg noodles and some veggies and you have dinner in half an hour.

Chicken with Porcini Mushrooms

2 boneless chicken breasts, cubed

1 slice bacon, chopped

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 shallot, minced

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 tablespoon rosemary, minced

2 tablespoons tomato paste

2 ounces sweet vermouth

1/4 cup marinara sauce

1 cup dried porcini mushrooms, soaked in hot water and reserve the water

1 teaspoon dried oregano

2 tablespoons heavy cream

Render the bacon for a couple minutes in the olive oil. Add the chicken and brown on all sides. Remove the chicken from the pan. Add the shallot, garlic, and rosemary and saute for a couple minutes. Add the tomato paste and let it brown for 1 minute. Add the vermouth to deglaze the pan.

Add the tomato sauce and strain the reserved mushroom liquid. Pour in about a cup of mushroom liquid and let it cook down a bit. You can add more as needed. Add the oregano and mushrooms and cook for a couple minutes. Return chicken to the pan and add in the cream.

Warm through and it’s ready. You can add some cooked egg noodles to soak up the sauce and some veggies or salad on the side.

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It’s peak stone fruit season, so I came home from the farmers market with peaches, nectarines, and plums. The plums were already ripe so I immediately set to work on a tart. I made some delicious sherbet with the peaches and nectarines, as well. But now for the plum tart.

I intended to leave a piece of this to photograph in the morning, but it was a little runny and I’ve tweaked the recipe a bit to make it less so. I will hopefully make another one soon and update the post, but until then, here’s the new recipe. It’s loosely based on a tart recipe from Ina Garten, I originally used another recipe for the pastry cream.

Plum Tart

For the pastry dough:

1 1/4 cups flour

3 tablespoons sugar

1/2 teaspoon salt

6 tablespoons unsalted butter, diced and cold

2 tablespoons Crisco vegetable shortening, cold

1/4 cup ice water

For the pastry cream:

5 egg yolks, room temperature

3/4 cups sugar

3 tablespoons cornstarch

1 cup 1% milk

1/2 cup heavy cream

1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 teaspoon Bourbon

1 tablespoon unsalted butter

1 pint plums, sliced

1/4 cup Apricot jam

1 tablespoon hot water

Combine the flour, sugar, and salt in a food processor. Add the butter and shortening and pulse until combined and the pieces are the size of peas. Slowly add the ice water in a drizzle just until it comes together. Turn out on a floured board and wrap in plastic wrap. Refrigerate for at least an hour and up to a day.

Beat the egg yolks and sugar together with a hand mixer for a couple minutes until thick. Add the cornstarch and combine. Bring the milk and cream to a simmer and then slowly add to the egg mixture. Return the whole mixture to the pan and cook over low heat with a wooden spoon until it thickens, about 5-7 minutes. Switch to a whisk when it starts to get thicker. Cook for another couple of minutes until it is the consistency of pudding. Stir in the vanilla, bourbon, and butter, and then strain through a sieve. Chill in a bowl with plastic wrap directly on the surface of the cream.

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

Roll out the dough on a floured surface to about 1/4 inch thickness. Keep rotating the dough as you roll it out so that it doesn’t stick to the surface. Put into the tart pan making sure not to stretch the dough because it will shrink. (Mine did anyway) Cut off the excess and patch any holes carefully. Line the tart shell with a buttered piece of aluminum foil and fill with baking beans (beans reserved just to use for blind baking). Place tart shell on a baking sheet and bake for 10 minutes, then remove the beans and dock the bottom of the tart (prick with a fork so that it doesn’t create steam bubbles). Bake for another 15-20 minutes, until the shell is lightly browned. Let cool.

Spread a layer of chilled pastry cream on the chilled tart shell. Arrange the slices of plum around the tart. Combine the jam and hot water to create a glaze and brush over the tart so that it doesn’t dry out.

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