Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Eggs’


Fruit tarts are probably my favorite dessert ever. I remember birthdays when I wanted a fruit tart instead of cake. This one has a flaky crust and pastry cream that isn’t too heavy. Plus, I found some delicious strawberries at the farmers market. I thought about just strewing them on top stems and all because they were so beautiful, but who wants to de-stem strawberries as they eat a tart? It’s one thing to create beautiful pictures, but my goal is to make food I want to eat above all. So, standard strawberry formation.

I love when the summer fruit starts coming in, there are endless desserts to make. When they look this pretty, you can’t go wrong!

Strawberry Tart

1 quart strawberries, hulled and halved

1 1/4 cups whole milk

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

3 egg yolks

1/2 cup sugar

3 tablespoons cornstarch

3 tablespoons unsalted butter

1 9-inch pie crust from this recipe

Roll out the dough into a round large enough to fit into your tart shell with some excess. Don’t pull it because it will shrink more, just coax it into the corners and cut off any excess. Place a piece of buttered foil into the shell and put dry beans or rice into it to hold the shape while it bakes (it’s called blind baking). Bake at 375 for 10 minutes and then remove the beans and prick with a fork to allow air out if it puffs up. Bake for another 20 minutes until it starts to brown. Remove and cool.

For the pastry cream, bring the milk to a boil. In a bowl, combine the eggs, sugar, and cornstarch with a whisk. Slowly add a bit of the hot milk and whisk vigorously to temper the eggs. Pour into the remaining milk in the pan and continue to whisk until it thickens, about 10 minutes. Pour through a strainer if you wish, and add the vanilla and any additional flavorings you wish (cognac or brandy are nice). Add the butter and whisk until incorporated and melted. Refrigerate until cool.

Pour the pastry cream into the cooled shell. Arrange the strawberries however you want on top. Optional, you can heat some apricot jam with a little water until a little runny and brush it over the top.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »


I have a lot of meatballs on here by now: classic spaghetti and meatballs, tuna meatballs, and chicken meatballs, and I thought it was time for vegetarian meatballs. These were inspired by a couple different recipes I saw across the blogosphere and they disappeared so quickly that I will have to make them again. They’re perfect for a party where meat-eaters and veggies alike will love them.

Lentil Meatballs

2 cups cooked lentils

1 cup drained and rinsed chickpeas

2 eggs

1/2 cup ricotta or goat cheese

1/2 cup grated parmesan

Juice of 1 lemon

1 garlic clove

1 tablespoon aleppo pepper

2 tablespoons chopped basil

2/3 cup panko breadcrumbs

1 tablespoon olive oil

Combine all ingredients in a food processor and blend until it creates a paste. Place on parchment paper on a baking sheet and bake at 400 degrees for 25 minutes or until they start to brown on top.  Squeeze a whole lemon over them before serving.

Lemon Pesto

3 cups basil

2 tablespoons pine nuts

1/2 cup grated parmesan

Juice of 1 lemon

4 tablespoons olive oil

Combine all ingredients in a food processor and blend until combined. Spoon over the meatballs or use as a dip on the side.

Read Full Post »


The last ramps of the season were sitting in my fridge, and what better way to use them up but with some eggs and bacon. I also had some leftover homegrown swiss chard that was given to me, so I threw those in with the ramps. A healthy way to start the day! Of course, there had to be a little bacon jam added but who doesn’t like bacon?

Eggs with Ramps and Bacon Jam

2 eggs

6-8 ramps, sliced in half

1 cup swiss chard (or other leafy green)

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 tablespoons bacon jam

Saute the ramps and swiss chard in the olive oil until they have wilted and caramelized a bit. Remove to a plate. Add the eggs carefully so as not to break the yolks and fry to desired cooking (I like the yolks runny so I leave them sunny side up). Season with salt and pepper and serve on top of the greens with a spoonful of bacon jam. If the jam is straight from the fridge, you can warm it up in the pan.

Read Full Post »


Almost everyone loves chocolate chip cookies. And there are almost as many favorite recipes for them. I’ve been baking my way through the Flour Bakery Cookbook, and have made the peanut butter cookies, oatmeal raisin cookies, chocolate chip hazelnut cookies, double chocolate cookies, and raspberry blueberry muffins. My apple oat muffins were also based on Flour’s good morning muffins. I haven’t been disapointed yet in any recipe (although my attempt at the coffee cake was disastrous….it overflowed the pan I was baking it in, but fortunately I had a cookie sheet below.)

These cookies are just the right blend of crispy on the edges and soft in the middle. If you’ve only made tollhouse cookies (like Joanne Chang did before she created this recipe), you really should try them. There’s nothing like some early morning baking to make the house smell good all day.

Basic Chocolate Chip Cookies

2 sticks unsalted butter

3/4 cup sugar

3/4 cup brown sugar

2 eggs

1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

2 cups flour

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

9 ounces semisweet chocolate

3 ounces milk chocolate

Cream together the butter and sugars with a hand mixer until light and fluffy. Add in the eggs and vanilla and beat together for a couple minutes.

In another bowl, combine the flour, baking soda, and salt. Add the chocolate and stir. Slowly add the dry ingredients to the wet on low speed and just until it is mixed through. Let it rest in the fridge overnight.

Place 1/4 cup balls on a cookie sheet a couple inches apart and flatten slightly with your hand. Bake at 350 degrees for 15-18 minutes, until they are browned on the edges and still soft in the middle. Let cool on the sheet for a couple minutes, and then transfer to a wire rack.

Read Full Post »


So, I went a little nuts with the baking last weekend because I was baking for the New Music Bake Sale in Brooklyn. I made two kinds of cookies and some banana bread, and it was tons of fun. I realized after the fact that I should have made my gougeres since they are probably the most popular thing I’ve ever made. Oh well. You’ll just have to wait for those.

I’ve been slowly baking my way through the Flour Bakery cookbook, and so far I haven’t really been disappointed in anything. These peanut butter cookies are no exception. They are a little more cakey than I probably would prefer, but then again, most peanut butter cookies get that way because of the texture of peanut butter when baked. I definitely have to agree they are delicious and I would definitely make them again. They are just the right amount of sweet and salty, and fresh out of the oven they are amazing.

Peanut Butter Cookies

2 sticks butter

1 cup sugar

1 cup packed light brown sugar

2 eggs

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 jar chunky peanut butter (1 3/4 cups)

2 2/3 cups flour

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon salt

Cream together the butter and sugars for 5 minutes with a hand mixer until smooth and light in color. Beat in the eggs and vanilla until thoroughly combined. Scrape down the bowl and then add in the peanut butter and combine.

Meanwhile, combine the flour, baking soda, and salt in another bowl. Slowly add to the wet ingredients and don’t over beat. Refrigerate overnight.

Roll into 1 inch balls and flatten into discs. Using a fork, make cross-hatch marks on top (the traditional peanut butter cookie decoration).

Bake for 20 minutes at 350 degrees or until they start to brown around the edges. Let cool on a rack.

Read Full Post »


As I’ve mentioned before, one of my favorite bakeries in the world is Flour Bakery in Boston. I remember Sunday mornings and trying to decide what I wanted most. I’ve been waiting to try the muffin recipes from the cookbook, but it’s usually a last minute thought and I don’t regularly keep Creme Fraiche lying around. So far, everything I’ve tried from the book has been really delicious like the Double Chocolate Cookies and the Chocolate Hazelnut Cookies. I even adapted the one muffin recipe that didn’t use Creme Fraiche into my Apple Oat Muffins and they were delicious.

These muffins were so light and fluffy, with a glorious crunchy muffin top that just crackles in the right way when you pull it off. Let’s be honest, most people go straight for the muffin top and then reluctantly eat the rest. These are so good, that you will love eating the whole thing.

The original recipe uses raspberry and rhubarb, and it gives suggestions for alternate recipes like the classic blueberry muffin. I adjusted based on what I had in the freezer, which in this case was frozen raspberries and blueberries. I like to bake them fresh, so I’ll keep the batter in the fridge and bake them in the morning. It lasts a couple days, and they turn out so much better when baked fresh. But you can refresh them by popping them back in the oven for a couple minutes.

Raspberry Blueberry Muffins

3 1/4 cups flour

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

4 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

2 eggs plus 1 yolk

1 1/4 sticks butter, melted

1 cup milk

1 1/3 cup sugar

1 cup creme fraiche

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

1 cup frozen raspberries

1 cup frozen blueberries

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and line muffin tin with paper liners. In a large bowl, combine the flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt. In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs and then add the sugar, butter, milk, creme fraiche, and vanilla, making sure all ingredients are at room temperature. I like to add the melted butter with the sugar and then everything else, so that it doesn’t re-solidify at all if your ingredients are a little colder.

Pour the liquid mixture into the dry ingredients and fold gently using a spatula. Fold in the berries gently. The batter is a little lumpy but don’t worry. Spoon into the muffin tin to fill the cups. Bake for 40 minutes until the muffin tops are golden brown and let cool before removing them.

Read Full Post »


As you may know by now, I have a thing for pasta. But after two weeks of pasta-free cleansing, I couldn’t decide what kind I wanted first. And then I started to feel like maybe I shouldn’t be too decadent (with a loaded mac and cheese, for instance), since I just spent two weeks without white flours. So, I decided to compromise. It’s usually the right answer, and dinner was no exception. I made some spelt pappardelle (with leftover spelt flour– it’s a whole grain) and of course, I still don’t have a pasta machine so I rolled it by hand. At least my arms would get a workout while making it. I’ve made regular pasta dough this way, but I don’t do it often.

I went with the ingredients I had on hand, which included a leek, mushrooms, and some chevre. Mushrooms gave it a nice meatiness, particularly with the musty darkness of the dried porcini that reminds me of a forest. I threw in a little leftover chevre because I wanted an unctuous creaminess to the sauce without the fat content of cream. I must say, the combination went really well with the hearty spelt pasta.

Spelt Pappardelle with Leeks and Mushrooms

1 leek, chopped

2 garlic cloves, chopped

2 cups crimini mushrooms, sliced

1 handful dried porcini, soaked for 10 minutes in a 1/2 cup hot water

1 cup white wine

1 tablespoon chopped rosemary

1 tablespoon chopped thyme

3 tablespoons chevre

1 cup spelt flour

1 cup AP flour

3 eggs

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 pinch salt

Place the flours on a counter or board and make a well in the center. Add the eggs, olive oil, and salt to the well. Gently, using a fork, start the incorporate from the center of the well out. It will start to come together and you will need to start kneading with your hands. Once it has formed a ball and you have kneaded for a couple minutes, wrap in plastic wrap and let it rest in the refrigerator for at least a half an hour. Roll out on a floured board as thinly as you can and cut into pappardelle about 1/2 inch thick. Or, of course you can use a pasta machine. Make sure to dust in flour until you use it so it doesn’t stick together.

Saute the leek and garlic in a couple tablespoons olive oil until they have softened. Add the crimini mushrooms and rosemary and thyme. Once they have browned a bit, add the porcini and reserve the water. Deglaze the pan with the white wine and add the porcini water (straining out any grit in the bottom).

Meanwhile, cook the pasta in heavily salted water until it starts to float. Add the chevre to the sauce and stir to melt. Add the pasta along with a little of the cooking water to the sauce. Stir through and serve with some parmesan or grana padano sprinkled on top. I had some leftover toasted breadcrumbs with herbs in the fridge so I threw some of that on top as well.

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: