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Posts Tagged ‘mushroom’


Individual Bread Puddings - Meatballs&Milkshakes

Bread pudding is the perfect way to use up leftovers, whether it’s vegetables from last night’s dinner, bacon from yesterday’s breakfast (who has leftover bacon?!), or bits of cheese after that party. The important thing is to have some flavorings like onions, garlic, and herbs along with cheese and eggs to soak into day old bread and bake up into a lovely custardy breakfast. I like to make them in single servings or in cupcake pans so that I can take them with me on busy mornings. They also freeze well and you can heat straight from the freezer in single servings.

Individual Bread Puddings

5 eggs

1 cup milk

2 cups day old bread, cubed (small if making individual servings, they have to fit in the muffin cups)

1/2 cup grated cheddar

1/2 cup grated asiago

1/2 onion, minced (or leftover)

1 garlic clove, minced

1 cup spinach, chopped (or leftover)

1 cup mushrooms, sliced (or leftover)

1 cup white wine

2 tablespoons sage, minced

Parmesan cheese for grating

Saute the onion, garlic,sage,  and mushrooms in a couple tablespoons olive oil until softened, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Add the spinach and allow to wilt. Add the white wine and allow the alcohol to cook off, about 2 minutes. Transfer to a bowl to cool.

Meanwhile, in another bowl, whisk together the eggs and milk. Season with salt and pepper, and add in the cheddar and asiago. Add in the bread along with the vegetable mixture. Make sure the bread soaks up a lot of the liquid before cooking. Pour into lined muffin pans, individual ramekins, or a large baking dish. Top with grated parmesan and bake at 375 degrees for 15 minutes if using muffin pans and up to 45 minutes if using a baking dish. Make sure they have started to brown and puff up, to know they are done.

Individual Bread Puddings - Meatballs&Milkshakes

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If you’ve noticed that my posts have slowed down, it’s because we’re planning a move and I’ve been sidetracked on that project… but the upside is that I’m getting creative with recipes to use up pantry and freezer ingredients.

This week, I made veggie burgers to use up lentils and breadcrumbs in the pantry. Of course, fresh breadcrumbs would be so much better, but that wouldn’t use up the ones sitting on the shelf. The nice thing about veggie burgers is that you can really adapt the flavors to whatever you like. I added in a chopped chili pepper that was growing in our garden, and they are really spicy! I topped them with some sriracha mayo because they can always use some moisture (although I had ketchup on mine because I’m just not a mayo fan).

Veggie Burgers with Sriracha Mayo

1 cup cooked lentils (mine were leftover from a previous dinner, so they had diced carrots and onions in them as well), mashed a bit

2 cups diced mushrooms

1/2 onion, minced

1 teaspoon garlic, minced

1 chili pepper, minced

1/2 cup fresh breadcrumbs (or dried, but fresh are better)

2 eggs, beaten

2 tablespoons goat cheese

1 tablespoon mayo

1 teaspoon sriracha

Pickles

Saute the onion in a little olive oil to soften. Add the garlic, chili pepper and mushrooms and allow to soften and start to brown. Remove from heat and add to lentils in a large bowl. Add in the breadcrumbs, goat cheese, and eggs and stir to combine. Refrigerate for an hour, until cold.

In a small bowl, combine the mayo and sriracha and stir together. Reserve for topping.

Form mixture into patties and saute in some olive oil for 2 minutes on each side, until browned. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 15 minutes, until they are cooked all the way through. Serve on a toasted bun with the topping of your choice.

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It’s time for another recipe upgrade. I love making stuffed mushrooms, and they’re so quick on a weeknight. I wrote this recipe a while back, but it needed better pictures.

For the nights when I don’t want meat, these fill their place easily. I sometimes change up the ingredients in the stuffing depending on what I have lying around. If you wanted to add some meat, you could add some rendered sausage or bacon, or even just sliced prosciutto.

Stuffed Mushrooms

2 portobello mushrooms

1 shallot or 1/4 of an onion, minced

1 clove of garlic, minced

1 teaspoon chopped thyme

1/4 cup panko breadcrumbs

1/4 cup grated parmesan or grana padano

3 tablespoons chopped parsley

1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar

2 tablespoons olive oil

salt and pepper

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Remove stems from mushrooms, chop them up and reserve for the stuffing. Brush the mushrooms with the balsamic vinegar and 1 tablespoon of the olive oil. Roast in the oven for 10-15 minutes, until they start to give up some of their liquid.

Meanwhile, combine the chopped stems with the shallot, garlic, thyme, breadcrumbs, cheese, and parsley. Add salt and pepper to season. Stuff the mushrooms with the mixture and drizzle the remaining olive oil on their tops. Roast for another 10-15 minutes, until they start to brown on top. You can also use the broiler to get a nice brown on top if necessary.

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I love mushrooms. Except for shitakes and button mushrooms. More often than not, I pair them with marsala and thyme or rosemary. They just go so well together and give everything a nice meaty, earthy flavor.

Occasionally I treat myself to some beautiful varieties at the farmers market, and this week I got some hen of the woods, oyster, and crimini mushrooms. Since I’m trying to keep from eating pasta this week, which would be my natural go-to with such lovely mushrooms, I decided to make some crostini. The bread was from the bread-making class I took at Le Pain Quotidien last week, and it was airy and delicious. A perfect little appetizer.

Wild Mushroom Crostini

1 pound assorted mushrooms

1 shallot, sliced thinly

2 garlic cloves, sliced

1/2 cup sherry or marsala wine

1 tablespoon minced rosemary

baguette slices (toasted or untoasted, your choice)

extra virgin olive oil or truffle oil for drizzling

Saute the shallot in a little olive oil for a few minutes until softened and add the mushrooms. Allow them to caramelize and develop some color before moving them. Once they are cooked through, add the garlic, rosemary, and marsala. Let the liquid cook off and them spoon over baguette slices. Drizzle with olive oil or truffle oil and enjoy!

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I love making lasagna when I’m going to have people over because I can hang out with people instead of standing over the stove the whole night. It’s also just great comfort food, and it makes me feel better whenever I’m a little down (almost as much as a delicious grilled cheese, especially when it’s made for me….). I’ve made roasted carrot and butternut squash lasagna and regular meat lasagna but mushroom lasagna is the most likely to make everyone happy. And it’s just so delicious and surprisingly easy to make. Who doesn’t love a good make-ahead pasta?!

Mushroom Lasagna

2 cups sliced crimini mushrooms

1 small onion, chopped

1 tablespoon rosemary, chopped

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 cup Marsala wine (you can substitute Sherry or any other wine, but Marsala is best)

2 tablespoons butter

2 tablespoons flour

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 teaspoon nutmeg, freshly grated

2 cups milk

1 cup chicken stock (substitute vegetable stock to make it vegetarian)

2 cups grated Italian fontina

1 cup grated parmesan

1/2 cup diced fresh mozzarella

1 cup basil leaves

1 package lasagna noodles

1 tablespoon truffle butter (optional)

Butter a lasagna pan and pre-heat oven to 375 degrees. Cook the lasagna noodles in salted, boiling water about half the time specified on the package. They should be pliable but not cooked through. Remove to a sheet tray with some olive oil so they don’t stick.

Saute the mushrooms, onion, and garlic in a frying pan with a couple tablespoons of olive oil. Add the rosemary and season with salt and pepper. Once everything has softened, deglaze the pan with the Marsala. You can leave a little liquid and turn off the heat.

Meanwhile, combine the butter and flour in a sauce pan and allow to brown. It will start to look like sand. Add the milk and whisk together. Add the chicken stock and allow to thicken. You want it slightly thick but not so much that you can’t pour it. Add the nutmeg and salt and pepper to taste. Add half the parmesan and stir to combine and melt.

Start to layer the lasagna with a layer of noodles, then a layer of the mushrooms and then a layer of the bechamel sauce. These should be thin layers. Add a sprinkle of the fontina cheese and a couple basil leaves.

Continue with the layers until you use everything up and make sure to finish with a layer of pasta. I like to reserve a little bechamel to pour on top so that the top layer stays nice and soft. Sprinkle with the remaining fontina, parmesan, basil and the mozzarella. If you would like, you can add some pieces of truffle butter to the top to help it brown and enhance the mushroom flavor.

Bake for 20-30 minutes until it starts to brown on top and get bubbly. Let it cool for at least 10 minutes before eating so that they layers can cool a little and set up.

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I always thought I didn’t like tuna noodle casserole until college. We had a wonderful southern cook for a few weeks who introduced me to this delicious variation on mac and cheese. I like to think the tuna gives it more nutritional value, but this dish is not about being healthy. I go to this when I’m in need of some cheesy comfort food, like I was this week. The creamy, cheesy sauce along with the flavorful mushrooms and crunchy crust on top make this one of my favorites. There’s truly nothing better.

I like to use Italian tuna in olive oil– it’s generally about twice as expensive as the American kind, but it’s so much more tasty. And the texture is more like actual fish. Try it if you haven’t, I don’t think you’ll be disappointed.

Tuna Noodle Casserole

1/2 box small pasta such as egg noodles, mini ziti, mini shells, etc

2 cups sliced mushrooms

1 tablespoon chopped rosemary

1/4 cup Marsala wine or white wine

1 jar or can tuna in oil with oil drained out

2 tablespoons butter

2 tablespoons flour

1 cup milk

1 cup chicken stock

1 tablespoon ground nutmeg

1 cup cheddar, grated

1 cup parmesan, grated

1/4 cup breadcrumbs

truffle butter (optional)

Cook the pasta in salted boiling water according to box instructions but stop about 5 minutes early and drain.

Meanwhile, saute the mushrooms in a little olive oil until they have softened. Add the rosemary and toss through. Add the wine and continue to cook for 2 minutes.

Combine the flour and butter in a separate pan and cook until the paste starts to brown. Add the milk and whisk so that there are no lumps. Add the chicken stock and whisk again. Add the mushroom mixture, the tuna, nutmeg, and about 3/4 of the cheeses. Reserve the rest of the cheese and combine with the breadcrumbs in another bowl.

Add the cooked pasta to the sauce and stir through. Pour into a baking dish and top with the breadcrumbs mixture. If you have some truffle butter, you can dot the top with little bits of it. You may want to reserve it and add before serving as well. Bake at 400 degrees for 20-30 minutes, until it starts to get bubbly and browned on top.

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As you may know by now, I have a thing for pasta. But after two weeks of pasta-free cleansing, I couldn’t decide what kind I wanted first. And then I started to feel like maybe I shouldn’t be too decadent (with a loaded mac and cheese, for instance), since I just spent two weeks without white flours. So, I decided to compromise. It’s usually the right answer, and dinner was no exception. I made some spelt pappardelle (with leftover spelt flour– it’s a whole grain) and of course, I still don’t have a pasta machine so I rolled it by hand. At least my arms would get a workout while making it. I’ve made regular pasta dough this way, but I don’t do it often.

I went with the ingredients I had on hand, which included a leek, mushrooms, and some chevre. Mushrooms gave it a nice meatiness, particularly with the musty darkness of the dried porcini that reminds me of a forest. I threw in a little leftover chevre because I wanted an unctuous creaminess to the sauce without the fat content of cream. I must say, the combination went really well with the hearty spelt pasta.

Spelt Pappardelle with Leeks and Mushrooms

1 leek, chopped

2 garlic cloves, chopped

2 cups crimini mushrooms, sliced

1 handful dried porcini, soaked for 10 minutes in a 1/2 cup hot water

1 cup white wine

1 tablespoon chopped rosemary

1 tablespoon chopped thyme

3 tablespoons chevre

1 cup spelt flour

1 cup AP flour

3 eggs

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 pinch salt

Place the flours on a counter or board and make a well in the center. Add the eggs, olive oil, and salt to the well. Gently, using a fork, start the incorporate from the center of the well out. It will start to come together and you will need to start kneading with your hands. Once it has formed a ball and you have kneaded for a couple minutes, wrap in plastic wrap and let it rest in the refrigerator for at least a half an hour. Roll out on a floured board as thinly as you can and cut into pappardelle about 1/2 inch thick. Or, of course you can use a pasta machine. Make sure to dust in flour until you use it so it doesn’t stick together.

Saute the leek and garlic in a couple tablespoons olive oil until they have softened. Add the crimini mushrooms and rosemary and thyme. Once they have browned a bit, add the porcini and reserve the water. Deglaze the pan with the white wine and add the porcini water (straining out any grit in the bottom).

Meanwhile, cook the pasta in heavily salted water until it starts to float. Add the chevre to the sauce and stir to melt. Add the pasta along with a little of the cooking water to the sauce. Stir through and serve with some parmesan or grana padano sprinkled on top. I had some leftover toasted breadcrumbs with herbs in the fridge so I threw some of that on top as well.

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