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Posts Tagged ‘olives’


Puttanesca is a classic pantry pasta sauce, using olives and anchovies along with canned tomatoes. It makes sense that that’s the basis of one of the stories about how it got it’s name. Either way, as we are starting to clean out the pantry in preparation for moving and we didn’t have a lot of fresh ingredients in the fridge, it seemed like a perfect sauce for the leftover gnocchi in the freezer. Be careful of the saltiness of the anchovies and olives, no need to add any more salt to the sauce.

Gnocchi Puttanesca

2 cups gnocchi

1/2 can San Marzano tomatoes

1/2 onion, chopped

2 garlic cloves, minced

3 anchovies

1/2 cup Gaeta olives, pitted and chopped

1/2 cup red or white wine

2 teaspoons dried oregano

Cook the gnocchi in salted water for a few minutes, until they float. Meanwhile, saute the onion and garlic with the anchovies in a little olive oil for a minute, until softened. Add the olives and oregano and stir together. Add the tomatoes and wine, and allow to cook together for a few minutes. Add the cooked gnocchi and stir together. Serve with some grated parmesan or pecorino over the top.

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As you might know by now, I love citrus. The olives in this recipe give it a nice salty, earthy bite and balances out the bright freshness of the citrus. Cooking this couscous in the juice really brings out the citrus flavor without adding fats like cheese and butter. I happened to find kaffir lime leaves and have tons leftover after making Thai curry, so I threw a couple in here. Feel free to leave them out, but I would suggest throwing in another herb or a bay leaf.

Mediterranean Citrus Couscous

1 cup whole wheat couscous

2 cups freshly squeezed orange and lemon juice (preferably more orange than lemon but whatever you have)

zest of the citrus used

3 kaffir lime leaves

1 teaspoon salt

1 garlic clove

1/4 cup Gaeta olives, pitted and chopped

3 tablespoons parsley, chopped (optional)

Bring the juice to a boil and add in the kaffir, garlic, zest, and salt. Let it reduce down a bit and then add the couscous. Boil according to package instructions– the liquid should cook off but you can drain it if you have leftover. Stir in the olives and parsley.

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I love citrus in my salad, and I’m not really big on salad in other variations. So, that means we eat a lot of citrus vinaigrette. A bright, colorful salad on the side of something delicious and indulgent balances and rounds out the meal. This salad is a sicilian favorite, combining blood oranges and olives. If I liked fennel, a little raw fennel shaved on the salad with a mandoline would be a nice touch.

Blood Orange and Olive Salad

1 orange and 1 blood orange, supremed

1/2 cup olives like Gaeta or your favorite, sliced

3 cups spinach

1 lemon

4 tablespoons olive oil

1 tablespoon honey

salt and pepper

2 tablespoons toasted pine nuts (optional)

To make the vinaigrette, combine the juice of the lemon, olive oil, honey, and salt and pepper to taste and whisk together. Supreme the citrus by slicing the top and bottom off the peel, running your knife along the side all the way around to remove the peel and all white stuff. Slice on either side of each segment so that you have citrus segments without any white. Squeeze the juice out of remaining bits.

Toss the spinach in the vinaigrette and add in citrus segments and olives (and pine nuts if you are using them).

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